Black Coffee No Sugar

Khamila is a Black Feminist. Don't try to figure her out, you may hurt yourself.
..... if you so wish... feel free to read her blog, which may give you an idea of who she is.

This is a blog about race, gender, sexuality and her anger with the perpetuation of White-Supremacist-Capitalist-Imperialist-Heteronormative-Patriarchy!

Unconventional. Undermined. Undefined.

But never unspoken.


"If I were really asked to define myself, I wouldn't start with race; I wouldn't start with blackness; I wouldn't start with gender; I wouldn't start with feminism. I would start with stripping down to what fundamentally informs my life, which is that I'm a seeker on the path. I think of feminism, and I think of anti-racist struggles as part of it. But where I stand spiritually is, steadfastly, on a path about love."

- Bell Hooks






thelow-cal-calzone-zone:

I’m pretty sure this is my favorite quote from this show ever

(via therosethatgrew)

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chescaleigh:

sistermaryfake:

T-Murda giving you the real

bae

Snaps

(Source: betterthankanyebitch, via feniceargento)

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thereverieinrealityy:

Braden Summers traveled to six different countries to prove that no matter where you are, love is equal.

lovely.

(via chocoagogo)

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deebott:

kat-ruffin:

Eartha Kitt and Josphine Baker, 1950s

Wow

deebott:

kat-ruffin:

Eartha Kitt and Josphine Baker, 1950s

Wow

(via justjaybaby)




vivanlosancestros:

bluedogeyes:

Black-ish 01x01 - Pilot

Lp

(via bad-dominicana)

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Still amazed by this!



DECKED OUT, BROADWAY EDITION: KEKE PALMER’S 4 CINDERELLA LOOKS

Yessss go Keke!

(Source: midniwithmaddy, via deburgos)

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Tagged as: blacktheater kekepalmer broadway,

dopenmind:

Why is it that culture is only innovative and worth discussing before a grand audience after it has been appropriated? Remember that article about the science of twerking? When I was a kid Black girls were being told they were “fast” for twerking at recess. Miley Cyrus does it on MTV and now it’s some marvellous thing they need to dissect and understand. This Christopher Columbus approach is such a problem. Recently VOGUE published an article about big butts being trendy. Remember when they sacrificed Sarah Baartman (and other African women) for science? Her body was considered abnormal and was therefore put on display as a paid attraction. She was considered wild and savage-like for her features, and even after death her body parts were still for public consumption. There are many hardships associated with being a Black woman, but I find erasure to be one of the toughest parts. Our bodies are not trends. (And not just Black bodies, bodies in general are not trends.) The same things they shun us for, the same things they call ghetto, unacceptable, disgusting, savage-like, unfit, insubordinate are brand new and cool now that they can be Whiter. And sure, they mentioned a few obligatory Black women but not in depth, not historically, and essentially not without sexualization. We’re discouraged from being openly sexual but our prowess is duplicated and profited from across the globe. Why is it that we’re never invited to the table of discussion? Why is it that our flesh is only worthy soaked in bleach?
#vogue #voguearticles #voguemagazine #culturalappropriation #blackwomen #africanamerican #blackfeminism #jenniferlopez #jlo #sarahbaartman #bigbutt #booty #butt #bodypolicing #bodypolitics #theinnocentwoman

dopenmind:

Why is it that culture is only innovative and worth discussing before a grand audience after it has been appropriated? Remember that article about the science of twerking? When I was a kid Black girls were being told they were “fast” for twerking at recess. Miley Cyrus does it on MTV and now it’s some marvellous thing they need to dissect and understand. This Christopher Columbus approach is such a problem. Recently VOGUE published an article about big butts being trendy. Remember when they sacrificed Sarah Baartman (and other African women) for science? Her body was considered abnormal and was therefore put on display as a paid attraction. She was considered wild and savage-like for her features, and even after death her body parts were still for public consumption. There are many hardships associated with being a Black woman, but I find erasure to be one of the toughest parts. Our bodies are not trends. (And not just Black bodies, bodies in general are not trends.) The same things they shun us for, the same things they call ghetto, unacceptable, disgusting, savage-like, unfit, insubordinate are brand new and cool now that they can be Whiter. And sure, they mentioned a few obligatory Black women but not in depth, not historically, and essentially not without sexualization. We’re discouraged from being openly sexual but our prowess is duplicated and profited from across the globe. Why is it that we’re never invited to the table of discussion? Why is it that our flesh is only worthy soaked in bleach?

#vogue #voguearticles #voguemagazine #culturalappropriation #blackwomen #africanamerican #blackfeminism #jenniferlopez #jlo #sarahbaartman #bigbutt #booty #butt #bodypolicing #bodypolitics #theinnocentwoman

(via howtobeterrell)




I can’t with this!





Truthhhhhhhhh

(Source: youknowyouwantsit, via justjaybaby)

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beautybyuche:

ecklecticsoul:

{Strolling Series by Cecile Emeke}

Sexism,Patriarchy,Racism and Colonialsm.Full Discourse

(via its-hard-to-make-a-dime-go100)

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“I plan to live out the rest of my life standing in the light of vulnerability and authenticity—and I will embrace anyone who courageously meets me there.”

Rachel Macy Stafford  (via le-dilemme)

(Source: thehistoryofsilence, via sheluvlike)



youngblackandvegan:

smokindick:

Erika Alexander Explains Why White Executives Only Cast Black Actors in Stereotypical Roles 

one of the realest things i’ve ever watched

(via jadakisspinkett)

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imsirius:

The way I dress is really about the message I want to send out to the world about who I am. Growing up in Alabama, I was black. I was poor. I was assigned male at birth — that’s how I like to put it. These things defined me, but I’m not any of these things. Clothes were a way for me to announce to the world who I was. I am not any of these things. This is who I am." - Laverne Cox

(Source: igperish, via pocketworthy)

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